Male commentators (channel 9)

Home Forum Australia Male commentators (channel 9)

This topic contains 58 replies, has 26 voices, and was last updated by  TB Sep 14, 2019 at 12:59 pm.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 59 total)
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  • #1259184
    mcleod
    • Posts: 3856

    Member since:
    Jul 1, 2013

    I can’t get on board with Mccloy after some of his social media comments about netball which is a shame because he’s alright. Maybe they were taken out of context but I think they were tone deaf and gross anyway. Rehn is alright but I think he gets paired with Cox a lot who does a good job of helping him do his which someone like Sergeant probably wouldn’t. I don’t think it has to be gendered, let’s just get good commentators and keep channel nines employees to a sideline, announced, introductory etc role where they ask questions of the actual experts. Men like Dan Ryan are brilliant commentators and because they actually know the game are so much more insightful.

    Dan Ryan was wonderful in the January Quad.

    #1259255
    Ian
    • Posts: 13629

    Member since:
    Feb 3, 2007

    He’s brilliant. The best in my opinion. My complaint with it isn’t that they’re using men. It’s that the ones they’re using aren’t that good, and the fact that they actually think it is a good strategy to use men to get new viewers. Which in my opinion is just wrong.

    #1259292
    intimidation
    • Posts: 23

    Member since:
    Jun 15, 2019

    To be more precise, I also enjoy Dan Ryan as a commentator, I don’t despise male commentators in general, just the current crop who are generic hacks at best. Former players (or men with more knowledge/involvement) would have a better rapport with players for interviews, would know all the players names, and have more insight into the game than “they’re down by 10 goals with 50 seconds left, they really need to start scoring to get back into it!?!?!”. Not all of the female commentators are brilliant either, especially the novices, but if they received the training and investment that their male counterparts have received, they would in all likelihood surpass them.

    I can’t think of any other sport which accepts such mediocre commentary (AFL, NRL, tennis, tour de france, darts, snooker, all american sports, etc.). Some of those sports will have a generic host which “welcomes viewers to the program” etc., but during play all of the commentators are experts who shed insight into what’s going on.

    #1259304
    Flb
    • Posts: 296

    Member since:
    Jun 18, 2017

    Like many on the thread I cannot stand listening to Seb and Annie, but I don’t mind the others. I prefer the expert commentary and an expert pairing and don’t mind whether it is male or female, like everyone else I love Dan Ryan’s commentary. I think it is so much more enjoyable to listen to. I agree that Jack and Tom have done quite a good job. I don’t mind Will, but I don’t know what social media comments are being referred to earlier.

    I guess given there are so few sporting arenas where females have a strong voice and netball tends to be viewed as a women’s sport is can feel demeaning to be given commentators that aren’t conversant with the game and seem to be there by virtue of the fact that they are men.

    Also intimidation I have to disagree with your comment about tennis – much of the tennis commentary can be appalling. There are some fantastic tennis commentators out there, but so often you are left with someone making moronic speculations about what a player is feeling and failing to talk about the game from a tactical/technical perspective.

    On another note a few of the players that I have been impressed with taking up the commentary mantle recently are Anna Harrison and Cat Tuivaiti. Cat is actually quite funny and I think would be a nice pairing with another expert.

    I wish that Harby-Williams would start commentating again, I always enjoyed her frankness. And while we are on the topic, I like Pamela Cookey’s enthusiasm, but she drives me nuts as she so often gets names wrong and I feel that is really fundamental to being a commentator.

    #1259452
    naks10
    • Posts: 155

    Member since:
    Feb 23, 2015

    I enjoy when Clint Stanaway gets a gig – his sister played state netball and played CBT, and to me he seems like he has an interest and knowledge of the game.

    #1260055
    Pardalote
    • Posts: 1781

    Member since:
    Apr 23, 2011

    HipHop makes a good point about expecting to see a thread like this on a male sport site outraged that a woman is allowed to commentate.

    But since they do have an effect on our enjoyment and experience of the game, I will comment. It has nothing to do with gender and everything to do with competence and intelligence. Channel Nine used to have Vacuous Hairdos doing the sideline interviews; most were female and all were embarrassingly bad. This year they learned and have put ex players to that job, and the quality of those interviews has improved. Of the play-by-play commentators, Seb Costello is undoubtedly the worst and can only have gotten the job because his father chairs the company. But Annie Sergeant – who is both female and an ex player – is not much better. I quite like Will McCloy’s commentary (I can separate that from his social media stupidity); it’s lively and well informed and he does not try to force drama like Sergeant and Costello do.  I would love to have Dan Ryan back. Many on here are happy that Kellie Underwood is no longer doing it, although I quite liked her style, and those of us who are old enough will remember that Steve Robilliard on ABC set the standard for years, and seemed to be the only person who could stop Annie from yaffling.

    #1260191
    Ian
    • Posts: 13629

    Member since:
    Feb 3, 2007

    Seem to have to say this repeatedly… We don’t hate all male commentators and think they should never commentate on netball. But what we do hate is the fact that it seems to be a definite ploy by Ch9 to use inexperienced male voices as some way of “taking netball to a wider audience”. McCloy actually said that on twitter before he then blocked me for daring to have an opinion that was different to his.

    Also, in reference to the number of women commentating on football, yes there are quite a few these days. BUT… they are only on the sidelines. They aren’t actually calling the game. I can absolutely guarantee you the abuse would be loud and long if a female took over as main caller for Ch9 on the NRL one night.

    #1260425
    Jbss
    • Posts: 1317

    Member since:
    Nov 3, 2017

    Seem to have to say this repeatedly… We don’t hate all male commentators and think they should never commentate on netball. But what we do hate is the fact that it seems to be a definite ploy by Ch9 to use inexperienced male voices as some way of “taking netball to a wider audience”. McCloy actually said that on twitter before he then blocked me for daring to have an opinion that was different to his.

    Also, in reference to the number of women commentating on football, yes there are quite a few these days. BUT… they are only on the sidelines. They aren’t actually calling the game. I can absolutely guarantee you the abuse would be loud and long if a female took over as main caller for Ch9 on the NRL one night.

    +1 to all of the above

    #1260923
    Nettynut
    • Posts: 69

    Member since:
    Apr 8, 2013

    The word ‘interception’ in netball commentary does my head in – doesn’t matter if it is a female or male commentator. Second, an intercept is an intercept, not a bad pass. One of the commentators was going crazy over ‘Em’ Mannix intercepts (why isn’t she ever called Emily by the commentators?) when one of them was an overcooked pass that sailed into ‘Em’s’ hands and missed Bassett altogether. A few seasons ago they used to be harder on what constituted an intercept but now anytime the defence gets a ball thrown in the air and not deflected it becomes and intercept. No wonder the stats are now showing 9 intercepts a game.

    Ellis did this with Geitz. Didn’t matter if the ball was a wayward bullet pass to her chest it was always a brilliant intercept.

    #1260954
    Ian
    • Posts: 13629

    Member since:
    Feb 3, 2007

    The word ‘interception’ in netball commentary does my head in – doesn’t matter if it is a female or male commentator.

    Might have to get used to it over the next few weeks. It’s an English thing largely. I think all those English commentators will be saying it.

    #1260961
    caribou
    • Posts: 496

    Member since:
    Nov 12, 2010

    Interception is a noun, intercept is a verb. If you intercept the pass you have an interception credited to your stats. The transition of verbs to nouns (and vice versa) is a common process in English. The replacement of interception by intercept is perhaps occurring faster in Australian or New Zealand netball usage than in other applications, (apart perhaps in mathematics, when graphing on Cartesian coordinates) or elsewhere in the world. Perhaps due to intercept being easier to fit into a small space on a stats sheet.   But yes, get used to it, because as Ian says the English commentators do still seem to prefer traditional English usage.

    #1260987
    Ian
    • Posts: 13629

    Member since:
    Feb 3, 2007

    Technically, interception is actually correct. It’s just that it sounds funny to us here as I can’t honestly remember a time when it was common usage here. It probably was but I don’t remember it.

    #1260992
    Luvpav
    • Posts: 408

    Member since:
    Feb 14, 2011

    There are females calling AFL matches.

    #1261056
    Ian
    • Posts: 13629

    Member since:
    Feb 3, 2007

    Who are they?

    Are you talking about TV? Free to air TV?

    #1261107
    NettySuperFan
    • Posts: 1486

    Member since:
    Mar 11, 2018

    There are females calling AFL matches.

    You’re not talking about side-line commentators are you? I don’t think there are any that call the play-by-play during the game

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