Jemma Mi Mi – The ‘Upsetting’ Reality Of SSN

Home Forum Australia Jemma Mi Mi – The ‘Upsetting’ Reality Of SSN

This topic contains 13 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  Tully Jun 16, 2019 at 7:55 pm.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #1219139
    Ian
    • Posts: 11596

    Member since:
    Feb 3, 2007

    #1219152
    amandalouise
    • Posts: 195

    Member since:
    Feb 4, 2007

    I do so enjoy reading these stories, and the insight it gives into individual players

    #1255827
    Pardalote
    • Posts: 1614

    Member since:
    Apr 23, 2011

    This is a very pertinent point:

    The hard thing is that the best way for them to get their face out there and get noticed is to move closer to city areas.

    But hopefully there’ll come a time when they don’t have to and we can find a way to integrate all that talent from the communities.

    It’s so much harder for kids from country areas, and if their parents don’t have the money to send them away to boarding schools – Geitz, McMahon – where they will get better training and exposure, then they are likely to languish.

     

    #1256087
    minkie
    • Posts: 1967

    Member since:
    Jun 21, 2014

    I’ve seen it happen with my work friends children with  hockey and netball.  The costs, travel involved is horrendous.  Only so many spots to get into academy’s or sports programs in the cities and we’re nowhere near as rural as some of these kids.

    #1256194
    Ian
    • Posts: 11596

    Member since:
    Feb 3, 2007

    1 in 30 Australians are indigenous. So I guess it’s not really that much of a stretch to think that only 1 in 60 top level Australian netballers would be indigenous. It will happen eventually that more come into the game. We’ve had Josie Janz and Beryl Friday in recent years.

    #1256203
    Turningpoint
    • Posts: 930

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    Feb 5, 2018

    I never knew that Geitz and McMahon were indigenous.

     

    #1256204
    mcleod
    • Posts: 3373

    Member since:
    Jul 1, 2013

    I never knew that Geitz and McMahon were indigenous.

    I don’t think they are, where you get that info from.???

    #1256209
    JR
    • Posts: 2042

    Member since:
    Oct 7, 2013

    TP, what Pardalote was saying is that country kids don’t get the opportunities, and need to go to the city for more training and exposure. Not that McMahon and Geitz are indigenous.

    But I don’t think McMahon went to a boarding school, I remember her saying she boarded with a family and had to travel a fair way to school on public transport.

    #1256214
    Turningpoint
    • Posts: 930

    Member since:
    Feb 5, 2018

    I know what Pardalote was saying. I love Pardalote’s comments on here.

    JR, respectfully. The story and reference in its context, is Gemma’s thoughts specifically to indigenous girls. Some from communities she visited.

    As an aside. A mate of mine coached Gemma in touch. Outstanding person he said. Talented touch player. No reference to her background. Just the person.

    Having being lucky enough to live in Brisbane and play A grade Rugby League. I have seen first hand, the sacrifice and challeges  country people from the country need to make. And also indigenous people from the country and communities. A bit of their story anyway. To fulfill a dream.

    I also know that some challenges were similar. But some were poles apart. Indigenous players from as close as Gatton, Murgon and Cherbourg and as far as Townsville or Arukun.

    Gemma was talking about her people. All that talent in their communities.

    I don’t want to get into political territory here. This is a minefield. But it only takes one visit to one of these communities to know that when referencing country kids. It’s not talking about what Gemma is talking about.

     

     

    #1256249
    James
    • Posts: 555

    Member since:
    Aug 12, 2014

    I think what Jemma was getting at with Indigenous in remote communities was more than just travel, Indigenous people have more caring and family responsibilities than other people in the community

    If you’re the older sister and you have younger siblings you look after them while your parents work therefore it’s harder to continue on to sport at the higher level. And yes there will be other people who have the same caring responsibilities but it’s almost every Indigenous that this happens in, also not just remote Indigenous communities

    Even when there is Indigenous netball carnivals it is very very rare to have a scout there. I travel to the NSW Aboriginal Netball Knockout almost every year with some of our teams and there has never been an ANZC, SSN or even ANL player there let alone a scout and this is where there are hundreds of young Indigenous girls and boys playing high quality netball over a 3 day period

    #1256283
    Pardalote
    • Posts: 1614

    Member since:
    Apr 23, 2011

    Good information, James, thankyou.

    JR, McMahon may not have boarded, but I know she went to an expensive private school – Carey? – for at least a couple of years, in order to advance her netball and athletics. Unlike the examples of family commitments that James is describing, at least her family circumstances allowed this to happen. There will be several dozen high quality indigenous and remote country youngsters who could be brilliant  netballers but will never get the chance to be 1) talent scouted, 2) coached 3)exposed to high level selectors.

    The AFL has much greater resources to be proactive about identifying and supporting indigenous footballers, but even then it probably depends on where you live: If you are on the Tiwi islands – where droves of brilliant players originated – then it will be worth the while of a scout to come up and have a look, and then the clubs can afford to bring you down to Melbourne (assuming family circumstances allow). But if you live in Broome or Derby, which are not well known as AFL nurseries, then your light will probably be hidden under a bushel.

     

    #1256307
    NZChampion
    • Posts: 1024

    Member since:
    Mar 12, 2013

    When I was playing social netball in Brisbane, there was one team that was fully aboriginal and they were the top of the table. They were absolutely amazing to watch, but extremely difficult to beat. The girls appeared to be city folk and their skill set with the ball reminded me of Malawi where they treasured the ball so well and effortlessly.

    There’s definitely a huge talent base for Australia to explore, its just finding and being able to tap into those small communities. Because I believe Australia will truely be formidable when those channels are open and available to NA.

    #1256631
    AllieC
    • Posts: 321

    Member since:
    Mar 24, 2013

    It’s a really interesting one. I live in a regional area of Victoria where the Aboriginal population is around 4.6% (Victoria 0.8% and Australia 2.8%) – we have had a number of really promising Aboriginal netballers over the years but none went any further. We usually have a number of U15 and U17 make zone academy each year. This means a 5 hour drive each way each weekend for training (after playing netball Saturday to get back Sunday night) and if they make the next step it is a 6 hour each way drive. A few girls from my club have made it this far and it is a HUGE undertaking for their families not only timewise but financially. The cost of accommodation plus fuel each week is enormous. One year we had 6 girls in a zone academy squad so they asked if there could be a couple of trainings here but it was “too far for everyone”……Many of them don’t go to the next level because they just can’t continue – these are from really dedicated families who have decent incomes. When it is this hard and you have every support it is understandable that the Indigenous girls can’t move up the pathways.

    I know there are some areas that have fantastic academies (and I think this is the way to go) but there needs to be more. The talent is enormous but there needs to be a huge amount of wrap around support for the girls and their families.  Talent ID, mentoring, financial support all will help.

    #1256643
    Tully
    • Posts: 749

    Member since:
    Mar 25, 2013

    Good information, James, thankyou.

    JR, McMahon may not have boarded, but I know she went to an expensive private school – Carey? – for at least a couple of years, in order to advance her netball and athletics. Unlike the examples of family commitments that James is describing, at least her family circumstances allowed this to happen. There will be several dozen high quality indigenous and remote country youngsters who could be brilliant netballers but will never get the chance to be 1) talent scouted, 2) coached 3)exposed to high level selectors.

    The AFL has much greater resources to be proactive about identifying and supporting indigenous footballers, but even then it probably depends on where you live: If you are on the Tiwi islands – where droves of brilliant players originated – then it will be worth the while of a scout to come up and have a look, and then the clubs can afford to bring you down to Melbourne (assuming family circumstances allow). But if you live in Broome or Derby, which are not well known as AFL nurseries, then your light will probably be hidden under a bushel.

    McMahon went to Melbourne on a scholarship to Wesley College. She boarded with a VIS teammate and her family (Katie Gold). McMahon was quite honest in that had she not had a scholarship she would not have gone to Melbourne at 16.

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